The discharge, in general, operates as an injunction against any act to collect an obligation of the debtor that existed on or before the date of filing of this case, with some exceptions. The discharge does not enjoin the collection of taxes not less than three years old on the date of filing for which returns have been filed, other taxes of a shorter period, the collection of student loans for which no finding of hardship has been made, or debts as to which the court has made an order of non-dischargeability.

In plain English, it is a court order that prevents all of your creditors from ever attempting to collect the debt you owed before filing – no one can ever ask you to pay on that debt again, and if they do, they can be sanctioned.  Now, there are some exceptions, as noted above.  The most common ones are most tax debts, and pretty much any student loan debts.  Finally, any debts that you reaffirmed are excepted from the discharge.  Orders of non-dischargeability as mentioned above are fairly rare – such orders typically happen when a creditor can show that you incurred a debt with the intent to discharge the debt. 

In short, the discharge is the key to your fresh start.  It frees you from the burden of debt and allows you to focus on rebuilding your financial future.

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